Preparing for the Holidays | French Connection

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The holidays are nearly here, and with it comes the final French Connection of the year!

We’ve been very busy in French class over the past few weeks, and so I’ll list some additional topics that we’ve discussed below that we won’t get to today.

The topics to be discussed today are in red:

  • Additional work with reflexive verbs (i.e. performing an action on SOMEONE ELSE)
    • This would be written similar to je vous écrire une lettre (I write you a letter)
  • Irregular forms of the passé composé using the verb avoir
    • I made a bonus Quizlet set based on this! Click here to access it!
  • Preparing for a party vocabulary
  • Asking for help

Continue reading “Preparing for the Holidays | French Connection”

Proving Segment Congruence | It All Adds Up

New It All Adds Up LogoFor necessary background information on this lesson, please click here.

Last time, we reviewed how to write a proof, and starting today, I’ll be sharing with you different purposes of writing proofs through basic geometry.

In Geometry class itself, we are about 3 chapters ahead of this, but given the importance of every postulate and theorem when writing proofs doesn’t allow for me to skip any content.

First off, let’s review what a postulate and a theorem are. You’ll see these terms many times over the coming months:

Continue reading “Proving Segment Congruence | It All Adds Up”

Les Misérable’s I Dreamed A Dream | In Tune

New In Tune LogoGood morning! The Holiday season has begun on 12 and Beyond, and I thought I’d transition back to more traditional, more instrumental music from pop.

For those of you that don’t know, I play the viola in school. I recently had the opportunity to participate in the Orchestra pit for the Spring production of Les Misérables at my school, and I gladly joined. We’re several weeks into practice, and while the music is insanely difficult, I am loving the experience.

I haven’t actually seen the play myself (though I would love to at some point), but one of my friends described it as so heartfelt, and there were parts that made him cry. Having listened to the soundtrack, I can see why. As with most productions, it’s the soundtrack Related imagethat really defines the play, and this is no different. Today, I am highlighting the Broadway version of the song, “I Dreamed a Dream”, arguably one of the more iconic songs in the soundtrack. I want to ignore the vocals, though, as exceptional as they are, because in my case, I came to appreciate the orchestra behind it.

There is something about being in an Orchestra, and for me, that’s being able to hear the melodies taking place all around you, both from the cellos and violins. In my case, you get both the high sounds and the low sounds, while the violas are sort of in the middle. And you appreciate those melodies, and it begins to really take the form of a song- and being a part of that is such a great feeling. I’m so excited to play for the actual play, because you now have an actual purpose for playing- and once you really get into it, being part of something so powerful, it’s amazing.

The soundtrack in itself is just so beautiful. My favorite part of the song, “I Dreamed a Dream” is when it goes, “duh-duh-duh-duh, duh-duh-duh-duuuuuh” towards the end of the song, if you know what I mean. When combined with the strong brass section, it sounds phenomenal.

The emotion provoked by every song in the album, my favorite being ‘I Dreamed a Dream’, is so amazing. I’ve become so attached to it, and the end performance, combined with vocals, story, and Orchestra, will be a beautiful experience.

And you can share that experience, too. Having seen a Broadway play last spring, I was so inspired to further explore the world of theater, and this is my opportunity. I realized how amazing theater was too even at a local level, when my sister performed in a play over the Summer, and I was truly moved.

I encourage you to have a listen to the Soundtrack however you prefer to listen to music (I use Apple Music), or you can listen to the individual track, “I Dreamed a Dream”, by clicking here.

Thanks so much for reading! Check out the Post Calendar on the Sidebar to see when special Holiday editions release towards the end of the month!

Gabe

Cross Country Travel Tips

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Good morning!

Back in July, I promised one more special post about my Cross Country Trip from June, but never got to releasing it. While on the trip, I began brainstorming ideas for this post (in fact, my grandfather suggested the idea for it) and have kept them in a note screen on my phone- until now.

These are genuine tips based upon my experience, and I tried to add some personal touches into a few ideas as well. Here’s my list:

  1. Take pictures- but only so many. I’m so glad to have the photo galleries from my Cross Country trip to reflect upon, but once you’ve taken say, a few dozen or so pictures of the Grand Canyon, put your camera away and physically take in the view. Anyone can view an image, but you’ll want to remember what it actually was like to be there. Savor the views- the sounds, the feel of the air…
    November Featured Photo
    November’s Featured Photo: Flying above the clouds over Lake Michigan during June’s Cross Country trip.
  2. Get the window seat. You won’t regret it. This trip involved me taking my first plane ride since I was 3- and I have a severe fear of heights. But when on the plane, it all went away- I felt safe (in fact, I pictured the plane as just a really, really big car) and was so glad to have the window seat. Between the views of the clouds, the horizon, and the Earth below, the plane made for some of the best views of the trip.
  3. Bring headphones. I find that if I have my headphones in, listening to music, I could zone out for hours on the train just taking in the scenery around us.
  4. At the same time, be alert, too- you never know when you’ll miss something extraordinary, like wild cows roaming along the train tracks.
  5. Talk to people- just because you’re on vacation, doesn’t mean you can just be antisocial. Put work or school behind you. If you’re traveling with someone, talk with them. Traveling can be a great bonding experience- and you’ll be able to share these memories for years to come, like me with my grandfather.
  6. Write things down as soon as you think of them. Keep a journal- this will help you treasure exactly what each memorable moment – like looking down into the Grand Canyon for the first time – felt like.
  7. Talk about it at home- share the best stories of your trip with those back at home. They’ll (probably) want to hear about it, and you might just inspire them to go out and explore the world too.

And most importantly:

  • Take a moment to step back and admire the beauty of nature. You’ll gain such an appreciation for the world around us- the Grand Canyon moved me to tears.
  • Go back. Don’t go somewhere just to say you went there- create for yourself that yearning to return and discover more.

And lastly…

  • When traveling coach overnight on a train, bring a pillow. We learned the hard way on that one. 😅

Thanks so much for reading!

Gabe

Want more stories and photos from this trip? Visit the Traveling Beyond category for many more galleries and highlights from June and future travels to come.

Holidays & Gifts | French Connection

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Hi there!

While this edition might seem a bit early, I try to correlate my in-class learning with what I publish here.

This edition involves aspects of different holidays (like the 4th of July & Christmas), but also gives vocabulary on different types of gifts for any occasion. Finally, you’ll learn a few phrases that will help you communicate using this vocabulary.

So, here’s the run down. Remember- the topics covered today are in red.

  • Aspects of various holidays
  • Vocabulary regarding gift-giving
  • Communication regarding gift-giving and holidays
  • Clothing Vocabulary (Review)
  • Communication regarding clothing and shopping (Review)

Continue reading “Holidays & Gifts | French Connection”

Algebraic Proofs | It All Adds Up

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Hi there! Sorry for the delay on this post… High School has kept me very busy.

For the rest of the year, most of our Geometry units will center around writing proofs. A proof is a logical way of proving that a statement is true, and it consists of statements and reasons that logically follow each other. Today, I’m going to teach you about writing algebraic proofs, which involve solving for a variable. Most of the year, though, we will focus on writing geometric proofs, which involve lines, angles, etc. With this post, you’ll get a general idea for what a proof is. However, geometric proofs are something that really have to be taught in a class, or be taught over the course of several days. I can’t really cover that here, and that puts It All Adds Up at a dilemma.

Here’s the plan: in order for you to understand future editions, you will need to research geometric proofs on your own. Learn what they are, how they work, and how you form a proof (since there are so many possibilities for statements and reasons). For It All Adds Up, I’ll be going over the aspects that can be reasons or statements, along with some tips for writing proofs with them.

For today, though, we’ll start simple. We already know how to solve for a variable, such as in x + 68 = 20. Now, each step that we would use to solve that becomes a statement.

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Take the 4 step proof above. Each step, from top to bottom, shows how we solve for the value of x. We know that x does equal 38, but how would we prove it? For algebraic proofs, there are several properties that you’ll need to know.

Properties of Equality (For Algebraic Proofs)

Addition POE: When the same value is added to both sides of an equation

Subtraction POE: When the same value is subtracted from both sides of an equation

Division POE: When both sides of an equation are divided by the same value

Multiplication POE: When both sides of an equation are multiplied by the same value

Other Properties (For Algebraic Proofs)

Distributive Property: When a number outside of a parenthesis is distributed to each value within the parenthesis

Now, there are many other properties, postulates, and theorems to come, but for this week, I’ll be focusing on simply solving for a variable (for the purpose of getting you used to proofs) and thus, the properties stated above will be sufficient. I’ll be presenting you with numerous others in future editions.

So let’s fill in the proof.

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Here’s another aspect I want to focus on: the given. The given is the starting point of any logical process, and will always be the first step in the proof. It’s what you are, well, given. For example, we’d be given the first equation and then asked to solve for x. As for the other properties, you always want to ask yourself: How did I get from this step to the next step? Your answer will vary- it might be adding 72 to both sides, it might be dividing both sides by three.

Usually, when asked to write a proof, you’ll also be provided with a solution. (This isn’t the case with algebraic proofs, though). That will be your last step. For algebraic proofs, your last statement will be ____ = ____, but with geometric proofs, it can vary. You might have to prove two angles are supplementary, prove two segments are congruent, or two lines are parallel.

I’m learning right along with you- and believe me, it takes me a while to process everything too. But overall, this is a proof. And everything you’ll learn this year from here on out will build on this format. Once you know what a geometric proof can be, I’ll supply you with possible statements and reasons, as well as specific rules and patterns that apply. Do remember though: a proof can have many different solutions.

Thanks so much for reading. Have a great long weekend!

Gabe

 

Niall Horan’s Flicker | In Tune

New In Tune Logo.pngAbout last time…

I’ll be honest- I kind of take back what I said a couple editions ago regarding Louis Tomlinson’s song, “Back To You”. In truth, “Back to You” is nothing extraordinary- sure, it has a good beat, but it’s just another pop song among a million others.

Niall Horan’s new album, Flicker, is different.

Continue reading “Niall Horan’s Flicker | In Tune”

A Tail of Three Kittens Part 3

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Welcome to the continuation of 12 and Beyond’s original series, A Tail of Three Kittens. If you haven’t already, I strongly encourage you to read the first two parts of A Tail of Three kittens. Click here to do so: Part 2 | Part 1

Like last time, this post will be set up in a journal format that goes day by day full of plenty of new photos and stories. Let’s begin on the night where I left you last…

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It was around 9:00 at night, and my mom and sister had just returned from dance practice. As they were pulling into our driveway, the car’s headlights illuminated our shed- and what do they see? Not a kitten, for sure, but a skunk and a humungous raccoon chowing down on the food we had left out for the kittens. (Pictures 3 & 4) When I came out, I saw them first. But little did I know, right behind me, sitting on the sidewalk, was baby Mac! Supposedly, while my mom was watching the raccoon, Mac started walking across the yard and eventually passed right by the car. She called out, “Mac!”, and he stopped. And he just sat there, watching her. As we’d come to learn, he’s so laid back and is so comfortable around humans. He didn’t run like we’d experienced with Callie- after a few minutes, he slowly walked back into the bushes. The girls had seen their kittens- this was my reassurance that my kitten was okay too.

Continue reading “A Tail of Three Kittens Part 3”

Using Reflexive Verbs in the Past, Present, and Future | French Connection

New French Connection LogoBonjour! Welcome to another edition of French Connection. Three weeks ago, I discussed using reflexive verbs. They are used when you describe something you do upon yourself, like brushing your teeth, and are extremely useful when describing your routine.

As usual, these are the topics that we have covered in French these past few weeks. In red are the topics we will cover today, and in black are topics that you might want to research on your own.

  • Making commands using reflexive verbs
  • Using reflexive verbs in the past tense
  • Differentiating between positive and negative adjectives & their meanings
  • Additional vocabulary related to jobs, as well as learning the difference between cognates 

Continue reading “Using Reflexive Verbs in the Past, Present, and Future | French Connection”

Writing Conjectures, Using Reasoning, & More | It All Adds Up

Screen Shot 2017-08-22 at 10.59.09 AMHappy Friday! Welcome to another edition of It All Adds Up! Once more, my Geometry class had gone further in content in two weeks than I can cover here. Below, you’ll find a bulleted recap of what we learned in Geometry this week. In red are the topics I will cover here, and in black are additional topics we’ve learned that you may want to research on your own:

  • Writing Conjectures using inductive and deductive reasoning
  • Writing the inverse, converse, and contrapositive of conditional statements
  • Structure of a conditional statement
  • Laws of Detachment and Syllogism
  • An introduction to everyday postulates and theorems that deal with geometry

Continue reading “Writing Conjectures, Using Reasoning, & More | It All Adds Up”