Dimitri Shostakovich’s Piano Trio No. 2 | In Tune

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I’ve always had a love for music- whether it be the repetitive, over-played pop music on the radio, or the soothing piano melodies that I listen to at night, but especially for the tunes that I can play myself. I have been playing both the piano and viola, and have a tremendous appreciation and love for both instruments.

However, while I enjoy playing classical melodies on my own instruments, I’ve never really taken a moment to step back, listen, and admire the beauty the genre is. That is, until I met my best friend, Liam.

We share the same appreciation for music; we both play string instruments (he plays the violin), and we both play for our high school’s Orchestra. We’re even involved in the Live Orchestra for our school’s upcoming musical.

But while I’ve mostly been brought up on the modern ‘crap’ that makes up the majority of mainstream culture today, he has a much more pronounced and sophisticated interest in music, not to mention he’s incredibly talented.

Liam inspired me to start listening and appreciate other kinds of music, classical in particular. This semester, we’re playing Waltz No. 2 in Orchestra, and once I really set Screen Shot 2018-02-16 at 10.19.01 PM.pngapart the melody (which sounds even better when you play it yourself), it’s beautiful.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been browsing through several classical music stations, and the music has been really nice, though I haven’t been able to recognize any songs. So, I set out to get myself more familiar with the likes of classical music. Liam had mentioned that Shostakovich was, in fact, his favorite composer, so I figured that was an excellent place to start. I did some research, and came across this newly released album featuring Dimitri Shostakovich’s Piano Trio No. 2 in E Minor, Op. 67.

The song already struck a chord with me, particularly because I’m especially familiar with all three instruments (the piano, violin, and cello). And throughout the melody, all three rotate in dominance, and it makes for a really dynamic piece of music.

Of the four individual sections featured, I’d have to say the Moderato is my favorite. The high-pitched violin bowing and pizzicato, coupled with the cello’s low, solemn style of playing, creates a wonderful contrast that is only enhanced by the distinct piano chords in the background.

What I love about this piece is its particular ability to be distinguished into the melodies and harmonies of each individual instrument, an ability that I love as part of an Orchestra, which only makes the song more true and meaningful, further building my appreciation for it. And while it is slow-moving and has less of a profound, consistent melody, that’s what makes the piece so much more unique and established.

Classical music is such a wonderful thing.

And Liam, you’re awesome. 🙂



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